Children

NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments

See the NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments browser for an in-depth description of many common health issues.


Childrens Health

There is a good guide on the NHS website which describes various conditions affecting children.  There is advice on how to diagnose them, how to treat them and if further advice should be consulted.

NHS childhood illness slideshow


When Should I Worry?

Having an ill child can be a very scary experience for parents. If you understand more about the illness it can help you to feel more in control. This booklet is for parents (and older children) and deals with common infections in children who are normally healthy.

Download the booklet


Fevers

Most symptoms of a fever in young children can be managed at home with infant paracetamol. If the fever is very high, they may have an infection that needs treating with antibiotics.


Head Lice

Head lice are insects that live on the scalp and neck. They may make your head feel itchy. Although head lice may be embarrassing and sometimes uncomfortable, they don’t usually cause illness. However, they won’t clear up on their own and you need to treat them promptly


Nosebleeds

Nosebleeds (also known as epistaxis) are fairly common, especially in children, and can generally be easily treated.


These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Women

NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments

See the NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments browser for an in-depth description of many common health issues.


Decision aids

NHS Direct Patient Decision Aids (PDAs) are designed to help patients make difficult decisions about their treatments and medical tests. They are used when there is no clinical evidence to suggest that one treatment is better than another and patients need help in deciding which option will be best for them.

Cervical Screening (Smear Tests)

Cervical screening is a method of preventing cervical cancer by detecting abnormal cells in the cervix (lower part of the womb). Cervical screening is not a test for cancer, but it is a test to check the health of the cervix.

Most women’s test results show that everything is normal. But for one in 20 women, the test will show some changes in the cells of the cervix. Most of these changes will not lead to cervical cancer and the cells will go back to normal on their own. In some cases, the abnormal cells need to be treated to prevent them becoming a problem later.

NHS Choices – Cervical Screening
The why, when & how guide to cervical screening

Cervical Screening
This factsheet is for women who would like information about having a cervical smear test for screening. This means having the test when you don’t have any symptoms.


HPV Vaccination

Since September 2008 there has been a national programme to vaccinate girls aged 12-13 against human papilloma virus (HPV).  There is also a three-year catch up campaign that will offer the HPV vaccine (also known as the cervical cancer jab) to 13-18 year old girls.

The programme is delivered largely through secondary schools, and consists of three injections that are given over a six-month period. In the UK, more than 1.4 million doses have been given since the vaccination programme started.

What is Human papilloma virus (HPV)?
Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the name of a family of viruses that affect the skin and the moist membranes that line your body, such as those in your cervix, anus, mouth and throat. These membranes are called the mucosa.

There are more than 100 different types of HPV viruses, with about 40 types affecting the genital area. These are classed as high risk and low risk.

How you get HPV?
Types of HPV that affect the skin can be passed on by skin contact with an affected person. The types of HPV that affect the mouth and throat can be passed on through kissing. Genital HPV is usually spread through intimate, skin to skin, contact during sex. You can have the genital HPV virus for years and not have any sign of it.

How HPV can cause cervical cancer?
Most HPV infections are harmless or cause genital warts, however some types can cause cervical cancer. Most HPV infections clear up by themselves, but in some people the infection can last a long time. HPV infects the cells of the surface of the cervix where it can stay for many years without you knowing.

The HPV virus can damage these cells leading to changes in their appearance. Over time, these changes can develop into cervical cancer. The purpose of cervical screening (testing) is to detect these changes, which, if picked up early enough, can be treated to prevent cancer happening. If they are left untreated, cancer can develop and may lead to serious illness and death.


Resources

Cancer Research UK
HPV Facts and information

NHS Choices – HPV Vaccination
Why, how and when is the vaccination given and what are the side effects

HPV Vaccine
This factsheet is for people who would like information about the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine.


These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Men

NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments

See the NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments browser for an in-depth description of many common health issues.


Decision aids

NHS Direct Patient Decision Aids (PDAs) are designed to help patients make difficult decisions about their treatments and medical tests. They are used when there is no clinical evidence to suggest that one treatment is better than another and patients need help in deciding which option will be best for them.

Mens’ Health

Five health symptoms men should not ignore

According to NHS Choices:

“British men are paying the price for neglecting their health: more than 100,000 men a year die prematurely.

On average, men go to their GP half as often as women. It’s important to be aware of changes to your health, and to see your GP immediately if you notice something that’s not right.” Find out more

Sexual Problems

It’s estimated that one man in 10 has a problem related to having sex, such as premature ejaculation or erectile dysfunction. Dr John Tomlinson of The Sexual Advice Association explains some of the causes, and where to seek help.

Find our more on NHS Choices

Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer, though the most common cancer in young men, it is still quite rare. With 2000 new cases being diagnosed each year, this makes it the biggest cause of cancer related death in 15 – 35-year-old males. It accounts for around 70 deaths a year within the UK alone.

What to Look Out For

The most common symptom of testicular cancer is swelling or a pea- sized lump in one of the testes (balls). There is no current screening test therefore it is important that you look out for the following signs and symptoms.

  • A dull ache, or sharp pain, in your testicles, or scrotum, which may come and go
  • A feeling of heaviness in your scrotum
  • A dull ache in your lower abdomen
  • A sudden collection of fluid in your scrotum
  • Fatigue, and generally feeling unwell.

Resources

NHS – Information on Testicular Cancer

BUPA – Testicular Cancer

Prostate Cancer

Each year about 36,000 men in the UK are diagnosed with prostate cancer, making it the most common cancer in men. It mainly affects men aged over 50.

The prostate glandSymptoms

  • difficulty in starting to pass urine
  • a weak, sometimes intermittent flow of urine
  • dribbling of urine before and after urinating
  • a frequent or urgent need to pass urine
  • rarely, blood in your urine or semen and pain when passing urine

These symptoms aren’t always caused by prostate cancer but if you have them, see your GP.

Find out more about the symptoms, causes and diagnosis of prostate cancer by using the resources below.

Resources

BUPA – Prostate Cancer

NHS Choices – Prostate Cancer

Sexual

Sexual Health

coldBoth men and women need to look after their sexual health and take time to understand the issues that surround contraception and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

For instance there are some STIs, like chlamydia, that you could be carrying without having any symptoms. This infection can affect fertility, so it’s important to make use of the sexual health services available for free on the NHS.

Useful Resources:

Sex & Young People
A comprehensive guide to the questions you may have about sex from the NHS

Sexually Transmitted Infections
Issues, symptoms and treatments

Sexual Health FAQs
Expert answers from a qualified Doctor

NetdoctorFPA
Here you’ll find tips for a fulfilling sex life plus advice on STDs, contraception and common sex problems.

FPA – The Sexual Health Charity
Sexual health advice and information on contraception, sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy choices, abortion and planning a pregnancy.


Contraception

There are so many different types of contraception available that you should be able to find the right method. You may have to try several different things before you choose the one you like most.

Types of contraception Where do you get contraception?

Useful Resources

NetDoctor
A Family Planning specialist writes about the different types of contraception, the benefits and pitfalls and how effective they are

Contraception – NHS Choices
Information on Contraception from NHS Choices including why, when and how it should be used and with links to other useful resources.

Hormonal Contraception
This factsheet is for women who are taking hormonal contraceptives, or who would like information about them.


Chlamydia

Chlamydia is the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection among under-25s. Often there are no symptoms, but testing and treatment are simple.

Causes and risk factors Chlamydia is usually passed from one person to another during vaginal, oral or anal sex, or by sharing sex toys. It can live inside cells of the cervix, urethra, rectum and sometimes in the throat and eyes.

Useful Links

NHS Choices – focus on Chlamydia
Information, videos and advice from the NHS website

Chlamydia
This factsheet is for people who have chlamydia, or who would like information about it.


These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Living Healthy

Smoking, advice and helping you quit

clock2Smokefree
The NHS have produced “Smokefree”, a dedicated service to inform everyone of the dangers of smoking, the benefits to giving up and how they can help you kick the habit.

QUIT
QUIT is the independent charity whose aim is to save lives by helping smokers to stop. Smokers wanting to QUIT should call 0800 00 22 00 or email stopsmoking@quit.org.uk for free, individual, same-day advice from trained counsellors

Stop Smoking Widget
This tool gives you daily messages, and keeps track of how much you’re saving and how many days it’s been since your last cigarette. Great motivators for staying smokefree.


Eating Well & Exercise – helping you maintain a healthy body

We’re bombarded with scare stories about weight, from size zero to the obesity ‘epidemic’. But a healthy body is determined by different factors for each of us.

Eating well on a budget

NHS – Good Food Guide
Information on a healthy diet and ways to make it work for you

BBC Healthy Living – Nutrition
A good diet is central to overall good health, but which are the best foods to include in your meals, and which ones are best avoided? This section looks at the facts, to help you make realistic, informed choices


Sebastian Coe: Get active

Maintaining a ‘keep fit’ lifestyle doesn’t have to mean slogging it out in a sweaty gym. Just boosting your levels of general daily activity will reap big rewards in improved health and energy.

NHS – Why be active?
Even a little bit of exercise will make you feel better about yourself, boost your confidence and cut your risk of developing a serious illness.

BBC Healthy Living – Improve your levels of activity
Information and help for young and old about the benefits of increased physical activity & how to go about it!


These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Vaccinations

Routine childhood immunisations

Please note

** Where two or more injections are required at once, these should ideally be given in different limbs. Where this is not possible, injections in the same limb should be given 2.5cm apart.

The Meningitis C vaccination will be introduced during the 2013/14 academic year and the vaccine supplied will depend on the brands available at the time of ordering

Immunisations for at-risk children


Seasonal Flu Vaccination

Influenza – flu – is a highly infectious and potentially serious illness caused by influenza viruses.  Each year the make-up of the seasonal flu vaccine is designed to protect against the influenza viruses that the World Healflujabsth Organization decide are most likely to be circulating in the coming winter.

Regular immunisation (vaccination) is given free of charge to the following at-risk people, to protect them from seasonal flu:

  • people aged 65 or over,
  • people with a serious medical condition
  • people living in a residential or nursing home
  • the main carers for an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer becomes ill
  • healthcare or social care professionals directly involved in patient care, and
  • those who work in close contact with poultry, such as chickens.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice